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[Archive] Chapter 6: Summary of Experience and Way Forward

 

* School development process, difficulties encountered and suggested solutions
* Positive Effects of School-based Gifted Development Programmes
* Way Forward

 

School development process, difficulties encountered and suggested solutions

Based on previous experience of School-based Gifted Development Programmes, the school development process can be divided into five stages.

  • Schools that implement the programmes must be psychologically prepared for the various challenges they may encounter. Previous experience suggests many such problems can be solved eventually. After overcoming each difficulty, schools can make further progress towards the next stage. The following three examples can be served as reference for schools.
    Examples 1, 2 and 3

 

Positive Effects of School-based Gifted Development Programmes

  • The experience of Cluster School Gifted project has verified the three-tiered implementation mode of gifted education. The initial experience of the project has been concluded as follows:
    • Based on the three-tiered implementation mode, schools can design a suitable gifted programme that properly matches their gifted students’ characteristics and needs.
    • The implementation of School-based Gifted Development Programmes is in line with curriculum development in Hong Kong.
    • Teachers think the programmes, which benefit both gifted students and ordinary students alike, not only improve the creativity, higher-order thinking skills, and personal-social competence of their students, but also make them more involved and active in learning.
    • Schools have gained a deeper understanding of gifted education in general.
    • Teachers have developed professionally due to the implementation of the programmes.

     

  • Besides continuing the Cluster School Gifted Project, the Gifted Education Section's Seed Project has further enriched and extended the curriculum, and developed and explored some new topics.

     

  • The experience from the Seed Project has further proved that the special learning needs of gifted students should not be neglected. Gifted students are entitled to high-quality education suited to their needs, just like ordinary students. In terms of learning, emotional and behavioural needs, they have their characteristics and areas for further nurturing. Without special support and nurturing, the potential of gifted students is likely to become buried. Hence, school administrators should support School-based Gifted Development Programmes, promote and  implement the school-based gifted programmes in schools.

 

Roles of the Gifted Education Section

  • In order to promote gifted education and provide support to schools, the Gifted Education Section conducts a series of activities for the participation of  school staff frequently.
    • Lectures and seminars are held for staff who have little or only preliminary knowledge about gifted education.
    • Regular activities, such as teacher training, student training and collaborative teaching, are provided. In addition, professional advice was offered to support the implementation of the programmes and assist in programme evaluation
    • Inter-school experience sharing and professional exchange activities are promoted.
    • Online curriculum resources were developed.
    • With the cooperation of district education services, the Gifted Education Section organises regional school principal training programmes.
    • The "Curriculum Leader" training programmes are arranged for school principals, assistant school principals and curriculum officers.
    • Training for new Primary School Master/Mistress (Curriculum Development) [PSM(CD)] on ways to promote and design gifted curriculum is provided.
    • The Gifted Education Section maintains regular contact with tertiary institutions and relevant organizations, in order to promote gifted education in a timely and cooperative manner.

 

Way Forward

Curriculum development requires the accumulation of experience, and progresses with the times. Only in this way can it meet the needs and development of society. In addition, the development of gifted education in Hong Kong is still at an early stage. Its further progress depends on concerted efforts of the education community. To achieve all the goals of gifted education, the programme guidelines will need to be further reviewed, modified and improved on the basis of opinions collected from professionals in the education community, and the frontline teaching staff.