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Admission of students with special education needs by mainstream schools

LEGCO QUESTION NO. 15 (WRITTEN REPLY)

Date of Meeting: 15 November 2000



Asked by : The Hon LAW Chi-kwong

Replied by : Secretary for Education and Manpower

Question :

Regarding the admission of pupils with special education needs by mainstream primary schools, will the Government inform this Council:

  1. of the respective numbers of mainstream primary schools which commenced operation in the past and current school years; and among them, the number of schools which have admitted pupils with special education needs, together with a breakdown of the numbers of such pupils admitted to each school by classes and types of special education needs;

  2. of the estimated number of such pupils to be admitted to mainstream primary schools in the next school year, together with a breakdown by type of special needs, and whether the Education Department ("ED") plans to increase such school places and the types of special needs;

  3. of the additional resources provided to the schools which have admitted such pupils, and whether it knows how the relevant school authorities use the additional resources;

  4. whether the ED has created new posts over the past two years for providing relevant support to the primary schools concerned; if it has, of the number, ranks and duties of the posts; and

  5. whether it has encouraged mainstream schools and assisted the relevant school principals, teachers and other pupils to accept such pupils; if it has, of the details; if it has not, whether it will consider doing so?


Reply:

Madam President,

The Education Department (ED) has been providing support services to students with special educational needs (e.g. learning difficulties, speech defect, behavioural problems, autism with average intelligence, mild grade mental handicap, hearing impairment, physical handicap and visual impairment) attending mainstream primary schools. These services include remedial teaching, speech therapy, adjustment unit, as well as psychological and peripatetic services. ED also provides the following resources to schools for implementing the whole-school approach to integrated education and the intensive remedial teaching programmes -

  1. Whole-school approach to integrated education

    1. A non-recurrent grant of $50,000 is provided to the schools for purchasing additional equipment for pupils or paying for minor works;
    2. An annual recurrent grant of $1,000 is provided to the schools for each disabled pupil (i.e. physical handicapped, visually impaired, hearing impaired, mildly mentally handicapped or autistic with average intelligence) per year for organizing activities and supportive programmes;
    3. An additional resource teacher at the Certificated Master/Mistress (CM) rank is provided for each school admitting five or more target pupils to support the implementation of integrated education; and
    4. An additional teacher assistant is provided for each school admitting eight or more target pupils to assist the aforesaid resource teacher.

  2. Special Educational Needs Incidental Charges Grant

    Schools not participating in the programme in (A) above will be granted an incidental charges grant of $700 per year for each disabled pupil (i.e. physical handicapped, visually impaired, hearing impaired, mildly mentally handicapped or autistic with average intelligence) admitted.

  3. Intensive Remedial Teaching Programme

    Schools may apply for the operation of an intensive remedial teaching programme and the employment of an additional CM teacher for every eight to fifteen pupils with learning difficulties. A set-up fund of $7,200 and a recurrent grant of $6,270 per year will be provided for each programme.
In the next four years, ED will increase the number of primary schools adopting the whole-school approach to integrated education by about 20 each year. ED will also set up some 60 intensive remedial teaching programmes next year to support pupils with learning difficulties.

As regards the questions raised by The Honorable Member,

a. Among the 15 mainstream primary schools commencing operation in the past school year (1999/2000), 12 have admitted pupils with special educational needs (SEN pupils). As for the 16 mainstream primary schools commencing operation in the current school year, 14 have admitted SEN pupils. Details are set out at the Annex. All these schools are provided with the above necessary support services.
b. Based on past trends, ED estimates that, in the next school year, there will be about 7 500 SEN pupils admitted to mainstream primary schools or assessed to have special educational needs. Details are as follows:

Types of Special Educational Needs Estimated No. of Pupils
Learning difficulties 3 600
Speech defect 3 400
Behavioural problems 240
Autism with average intelligence 50
Mild grade mentally handicapped 70
Hearing impaired 50
Physically handicapped 30
Visually impaired 20

Under the existing policy, all the above SEN students can be admitted into mainstream primary schools. There is no need for ED to increase the number of school places or the type of special needs.
c. The additional resources provided to schools for admitting SEN pupils have been set out above. With the implementation of school-based management, schools will provide information on the use of these additional resources in the school annual plan and annual report. ED staff will also visit the schools concerned to provide professional advice on school development and to closely monitor the use of resources.
d. With its re-organization in early July this year, ED has set up Regional Education Offices to provide more client-based services to key stakeholders. Over the past two years, ED has also recruited two additional officers to provide relevant support to primary schools adopting the whole-school approach to integrated education. One of them is an Educational Psychologist (at the Specialist rank) whose main duty is to provide support and professional advice to schools concerned. The other is an Integration Officer (at the Inspector (Graduate) rank) whose main duty is to plan and carry out the administrative work on integrated education.
e. ED has all along been active in encouraging mainstream schools to accept SEN pupils through a whole-school approach. Relevant publicity campaigns, training and support are also provided to school heads and teachers. These include promotion seminars, school-based training workshops, experience-sharing sessions and training courses run by tertiary institutions. Publications such as newsletters, resource packages and teaching kits are also distributed to them. Moreover, ED has met with various sponsoring bodies, school personnel, parent-teacher associations and school management committees to explain how to establish an inclusive learning environment in mainstream schools and to help teachers master effective teaching strategies. A special education resources centre where learning packages and resources on special education are kept for teachers' reference has also been set up.

Annex
1999/2000 School Year


Name of school

Types of Special
Educational Needs


P.1


P.2


P.3


P.4


P.5


P.6


Total

(1) Tin Shui Wai Methodist Primary School

Hearing Impaired

1

         

1

Speech Defect

 

15

       

15

Behavioural Problems

 

1

1

1

   

3

Learning Difficulties

   

1

2

2

5

10

Physically Handicapped

       

1

 

1

(2) Po Leung Kuk Wong Wing Shu Primary School#

Hearing Impaired

   

1

     

1

Speech Defect

8

7

7

6

8

 

36

Learning Difficulties

 

3

7

11

 

11

32

(3) Tseung Kwan O Catholic Primary School

Hearing Impaired

1

         

1

Speech Defect

1

10

6

6

1

1

25

(4) Lions Club Ho Tak Sum Primary School

Hearing Impaired

 

1

   

1

 

2

Speech Defect

 

1

       

1

Learning Difficulties

   

2

2

3

4

11

Physically Handicapped

 

1

       

1

Mildly Mentally
Handicapped

1

 

1

     

2

(5) St. Antonius Primary School

Hearing Impaired

 

1

       

1

Speech Defect

1

15

7

5

2

 

30

Learning Difficulties

1

1

       

2

(6) Tai Po Government Primary School #

Hearing Impaired

   

1

     

1

Speech Defect

 

9

4

3

1

1

18

Behavioural Problems

 

1

       

1

Learning Difficulties

 

16

12

11

11

5

55

Mildly Mentally
Handicapped

     

1

   

1

(7) Queen Elizabeth School Old Students' Association Branch Primary School#

Speech Defect

2

4

4

7

5

1

23

Learning Difficulties

 

7

8

8

8

 

31

(8) TWGH Leo Tung Hai Lee Primary School#

Speech Defect

2

8

6

5

3

 

24

Learning Difficulties

   

6

4

   

10

(9) Hong Kong Cheng's Clansmen General Association Cheng Jack Yiu School

Learning Difficulties

     

1

   

1

(10) Pentecostal Yu Leung Fat Primary School#

Speech Defect

 

3

4

 

2

2

11

Behavioural Problems

 

1

       

1

Learning Difficulties

   

5

12

11

5

33

(11) Tsuen Wan Government Primary School#

Learning Difficulties

 

17

18

3

1

 

39

(12) Po Leung Kuk Cameos Tan Siu Lin Primary School

Learning Difficulties

       

1

1

2

# Schools which operate Intensive Remedial Teaching Programme



2000/01 School Year


Name of school

Types of Special
Educational Needs


P.1


P.2


P.3


P.4


P.5


P.6


Total

(1) SKH Tsing Yi Estate Ho Chak Wan Primary School

Hearing Impaired

   

1

     

1

Physically Handicapped

       

1

 

1

(2) Aldrich Bay Government Primary School**#

Hearing Impaired

     

1

1

 

2

Mildly Mentally
Handicapped

3

 

1

     

4

Visually Impaired

1

         

1

Learning Difficulties

1

 

9

16

15

15

56

Autism with average intelligence

2

1

       

3

(3) Hong Kong Southern District Primary School**#

Mildly Mentally
Handicapped

 

2

 

2

   

4

Visually Impaired

1

         

1

Learning Difficulties

   

7

 

7

8

22

(4) Yaumati Catholic Primary School (Hoi Wang Street)

Hearing Impaired

1

         

1

Learning Difficulties

   

2

     

2

(5) SKH Chu Oi Primary School

Hearing Impaired

     

1

   

1

Learning Difficulties

   

1

     

1

(6) Tsz Wan Shan St. Bonaventure Catholic Primary School

Learning Difficulties

   

1

     

1

(7) The Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups Lee Shau Kee Primary School

Behavioural Problems

   

1

 

1

 

2

Learning Difficulties

 

1

1

 

1

 

3

Mildly Mentally
Handicapped

1

         

1

Hearing Impaired

 

1

1

     

2

(8) Chinese YMCA Primary School

Learning Difficulties

     

1

1

 

2

(9) Lok Wah Catholic Primary School

Learning Difficulties

   

1

 

1

 

2

(10) PLK Riverain Primary School**#

Learning Difficulties

1

5

9

7

9

 

31

Mildly Mentally
Handicapped

1

3

       

4

Visually Impaired

   

1

     

1

Physically Handicapped

   

1

     

1

(11) SKH Ka Fuk Wing Chun Primary School

Learning Difficulties

       

1

 

1

(12) Cumberland Presbyterian Church Yao Dao Primary School

Behavioural Problems

   

1

     

1

Learning Difficulties

     

1

   

1

(13) SKH Ma On Shan Holy Spirit Primary School#

Learning Difficulties

 

3

5

3

4

 

15

(14) Ma On Shan Methodist Primary School#

Learning Difficulties

 

4

6

     

10

** Schools which provide integrated education
# Schools which operate Intensive Remedial Teaching Programme

Last revision date: 15 November 2000
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